Second Lesson: A Look Back

There’s one thing I haven’t talked about yet concerning this lesson: swords. The bad news? What we do is mostly repetition of last week’s exercise, the Fendente Mandritto. Oh, it’s great to get a chance to practice and refine it more, it just doesn’t make a very interesting blog post to end this week with. I might write something in the future about the specifics and quirks of the fendente blows (that’s the fancy term for iconic slashes with a sword), but I don’t feel ready for that yet.

Continue reading

Keeping Your Head Cool in a Fight

Stick avoidance. Hm. Seeing it on the course syllabus certainly didn’t ease my fears back in my first post. But how bad is it really? Continue reading

The 3 Turns: Meza, Stabile, Tutta

Most of the more “interesting” exercises are the ones that focus on one scenario. For example, a dagger defence exercise teaches us what to do against a specific attack. There are, however, some exercises that are not tied to one situation. Take steps, for example. I wrote about the 4 steps last week: passare, tomare, accressere and dicressere. (Confused about the vocabulary? I’ve added a glossary for quick and easy reference.) Steps are not defences or attacks, but are usually a part of them. They serve as building blocks for exercises like a dagger defence.

We begin our second lesson with a “building block” exercise similar to the steps. It’s time to learn the three turns. Continue reading