Getting Out of the Way

The time for battle has come. Your opponent’s eyes glint with murderous rage as he begins to charge. You brace yourself for the crash that will break bones and end a life.

Um… You know you can just get out of the way, right?

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Keeping Your Head Cool in a Fight

Stick avoidance. Hm. Seeing it on the course syllabus certainly didn’t ease my fears back in my first post. But how bad is it really? Continue reading

The 3 Turns: Meza, Stabile, Tutta

Most of the more “interesting” exercises are the ones that focus on one scenario. For example, a dagger defence exercise teaches us what to do against a specific attack. There are, however, some exercises that are not tied to one situation. Take steps, for example. I wrote about the 4 steps last week: passare, tomare, accressere and dicressere. (Confused about the vocabulary? I’ve added a glossary for quick and easy reference.) Steps are not defences or attacks, but are usually a part of them. They serve as building blocks for exercises like a dagger defence.

We begin our second lesson with a “building block” exercise similar to the steps. It’s time to learn the three turns. Continue reading

Falling and Balance

Why Should You Care About How to Fall?

After all, the main point is not to fall, right? Well, yes, that’s true. In a real fight falling would equal death. Thankfully we’re not really in the Middle Ages, so that’s not the case, but we will be floored in more advanced exercises. Because of that, it’s important to learn how to land safely and how to get up.

That’s easier said than done, of course. The teacher’s assistant is thrown down a few times to show us that learning this is possible, but I’m still doubtful. Landing safely from a standing position? Eek. Can’t we at least do this on a soft surface?

No. Falling in real life is not going to happen on a comfortably padded surface, so there’s little point in us learning how to fall on anything but concrete. This makes sense, but it does nothing to cheer me up.

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